Bearing Sensor Case Styles



  • A
    Case Style A

    Using the 2-wire method, the two wires that provide the RTD with its excitation current and the two wires across which the RTD voltage is measured are the same.

  • B
    Case Style B (TOP HAT)

    In a three wire RTD one of the wires is connected to one side of the temperature element and the remaining two wires are connected to the other side of the element.

  • C
    Case Style C

    The optimum form of connection for RTDs is a four-wire circuit. It removes the error caused by mismatched resistance of the lead wires.

  • D
    Case Style D

    The optimum form of connection for RTDs is a four-wire circuit. It removes the error caused by mismatched resistance of the lead wires.

  • *
    Probe Syle

    The optimum form of connection for RTDs is a four-wire circuit. It removes the error caused by mismatched resistance of the lead wires.

  • *
    Custom Design

    The optimum form of connection for RTDs is a four-wire circuit. It removes the error caused by mismatched resistance of the lead wires.

  • RTD TOLERANCES PER IEC 751

  • A
    Class A

    ±(0.15 + 0.002*t)°C or 100.00 ±0.06 Ω at 0ºC

  • B
    Class B

    ±(0.3 + 0.005*t)°C or 100.00 ±0.12 Ω at 0ºC

  • 1/3
    1/3 Din

    ±1⁄3* (0.3 + 0.005*t)°C or 100.00 ±0.10 Ω at 0ºC

  • 1/10
    1/10 Din

    ± 1⁄10* (0.3 + 0.005*t)°C or 100.00 ±0.03 Ω at 0ºC

  • RTD RESISTANCE VALUES

  • 100
    100 Ohm

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  • 1000
    1000 ohm

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  • 120
    120 Ohm

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  • 500
    500 Ohm

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Testimonials

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Alan Smith

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John Franklin

What is a Bearing Sensor?

Bearing Sensors are specially designed for measuring the temperature in bearings where there is a risk of overheating in applications such as wind turbines, engines and gearboxes.

The bearings of industrial rotating equipment operate under arduous conditions - often for considerable periods of time. The most reliable indicator of bearing condition is the temperature of the metal beneath the shoe. Recognition of rising temperature can provide a warning of the breakdown of the lubricating oil film; thus allowing machine shutdown and maintenance to take place - avoiding the probable catastrophic failure of the bearing and possible damage to its mounting.

Features:

  • For embedded applications in rotating machines
  • RTDs - 100 ohm platinum, 0.00385 ohm/ohm/°C
  • Thermocouples types J, K, T & E
  • Single and duplex sensors
  • Various styles and sizes
  • Operating Temperature: to +250° F (+120° C)

    Bearing Temperature

    The stabilized operating temperature of a bearing is the result of many factors. The key influences on operational temperature are bearing style, lubrication type, operational factors, environmental conditions and level of maintenance The particular bearing style (ball, roller, sleeve, etc.), the shaft mounting style (slip fit, adapter mounted, press fit, etc.) and auxiliary items (housings, seals, shields, flingers, etc.) all contribute to a final operating temperature. For a given set of application conditions, a particular bearing type will generate friction given off as heat. A typical bearing temperature rise range would be 40° to 80°F (4° to 27°C) for most industrial applications. However, a bearing temperature rise over ambient of up to a 120°F (49°C) can be observed at extreme conditions.

    Bearing Temperature

    It should be noted when bearings operate at higher than normal temperatures, service life may suffer due to a deterioration of the lubricant oil film thickness and quality. The initial bearing selection should either be chosen with adequate design life hours to compensate for the anticipated reduction in service life or an appropriate lubricant for high temperature operation should be selected.

    Bearings may be exposed to abnormally high ambient temperatures or elevated temperatures in equipment such as furnaces, fans, ovens, blowers, steel mill/foundry casters, roll out tables, dryers, electric motors and generators, to name a few. In many of these cases, bearings are expected to operate above the limits for standard bearing products.

    If at all possible, locating bearings out of the immediate heat zones or providing provisions to reduce bearing heat are preferred means to achieve optimum bearing service life performance. This can be accomplished by insulation procedures to reduce radiant heat. Also, shaft heat flingers or cooling wheels coupled with heat resistant shaft materials can reduce bearing temperatures. The use of water or air cooled bearing units is another method to reduce bearing temperatures to a more manageable range. Though these steps incur higher installation costs, long term benefits may be gained by reducing lubrication and maintenance problems often encountered with high temperature bearing applications.

    When there is no way to avoid heat exposure, bearings can be specially modified to accommodate high temperature applications. Bearings having optional components materials, special internal radial clearances, high temperature lubricants and special heat treatments (if necessary) can operate successfully at very high temperatures

    Bearing Sensor Applications

    • Motor windings
    • Bearings
    • Shafts
    • Thrust plates
    • Applications where there is a space limitation

    RTD Sensor Configurations

    • General Thermocouple

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    • Thermocouple with Plug

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    • Bayonet Thermocouple

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    • Jessica Priston

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    • Patrick Pool

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    • Patrick Pool

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    • General Thermocouple

      Fusce vel tortor elit, sit amet sodales esent a justo enim proin pulvinar.

    • Thermocouple with Plug

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    • Bayonet Thermocouple

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    • Jessica Priston

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    • Patrick Pool

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    • Patrick Pool

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